thenemeton:

bucky barnes high fiving a little boy with a right-hand arm prosthetic as gently as he possibly can with an arm that can literally rip off car doors without a creak

bucky barnes redesigning his arm so it represents more than what he used to be and seeing a little girl dressed up as him for the first time he can’t help but grin and tell her how great she looks

bucky barnes helping bring publicity to a fundraiser that’ll help kids get the prostheses they need and letting several children braid his hair because he still hasn’t cut it yet

bucky barnes spending some time with dementia patients (or amnesiacs) because he understands how lonely it is when everyone wants you to be someone you don’t remember being at all

quiet hero bucky barnes

manamana6672:

missespeon:

outofcontextarthur:

can we talk about how this fucking pbs show aimed at little kids easily talked about how anxiety is stressful but normal

Ok no but can we talk about this entire episode? 

It was called April 9th, and it was actually a response to the 9/11 attacks. It didn’t talk about the attacks themselves, but rather focused on teaching kids to deal with the all of the emotions that they might be feeling as a result. They set up a situation that might evoke similar emotions in children: a massive fire at the school.

Arthur’s dad was in the fire, so (as you can see above), Arthur is constantly worried about his dad’s safety.

Sue Ellen is grieving because her journal, which contained a huge amount of precious memories, was destroyed in the fire. Muffy is confused why she can’t just cheer Sue Ellen up by giving her a new journal.

Buster wasn’t at school that day, and feels confused and guilty that he isn’t sad about the fire like the other kids. He then befriends the school janitor, who has to retire due to an injury that, at his age, is pretty serious.

Binky actually saw the flames, and is constantly traumatized by the event. He doesn’t tell anyone because he feels like he would lose his tough-guy reputation if he admitted that he was scared.

The episode teaches kids that all of these emotions are perfectly normal and natural, that there’s not one right way to feel, and that even if it takes a while, things are going to be okay.

The thing that makes this show so great, in my opinion, is that it knows that kids are intellegent and strong enough to deal with these things if you present them in the right way. It doesn’t hide them, it doesn’t sugar coat them, it just presents them in a way that children can understand and shows them how to deal with them.

Natasha is incredibly perceptive, and no doubt understands that Steve’s problems are less to do with his fish-out-of-water situation of being in the 21st century, and more to do with his crushing loneliness. Steve gives every impression of genuinely liking people, but he’s lost everyone he ever knew and grew up with, and is surrounded by people that he doesn’t really trust. He’s so lonely that he’s literally at the point of having intensely emotional conversations with a guy he met while jogging at the park, so Natasha is making the effort to help him improve his social life.

All of those girlfriend recommendations also come with a subtextual hint that she doesn’t want to date him, to discourage off the possibility of him getting too attached because she’s his only friend. She’s purposefully putting herself in the role of “bantery team member” rather than potential love interest, and as a result they seem to have a pretty close relationship already — or as close as you can ever get to Black Widow, anyway.

Black Widow and Falcon in Captain America: The Winter Soldier

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